CLS Fellows Faculty & Mentors

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Faculty

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Michael Schutt, Program Director
Director, CLS Law Student Ministries
Director, Institute for Christian Legal Studies
Clinical Professor, Trinity Law School

Mike Schutt is the director of CLS Law Student Ministries and of the Institute for Christian Legal Studies (ICLS), a cooperative ministry of CLS and Trinity Law School, where he serves as a professor. Mike writes, speaks, and teaches on the relationship of lawyers, faith, and culture. Before joining the Trinity faculty, Professor Schutt taught at Regent University School of Law in Virginia Beach and practiced law in Fort Worth, Texas with Thompson & Knight. He is an honors graduate of the University of Texas School of Law.

Mike is the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Christian Legal Thought, a publication of ICLS, and he is the author of Redeeming Law: Christian Calling and the Legal Profession (InterVarsity Press 2007), a vocational exhortation for law students and lawyers. His other publications include Oliver Wendell Holmes and the Decline of the American Lawyer: Social Engineering, Religion, and the Search for Professional Identity, 30 RUTGERS L. J. 143 (1998) and What's A Nice Christian Like You Doing in a Profession Like This? 11 REGENT U. L. REV. 137 (1998-99). He has also authored supplements on biblical principles for use by his students in the law school classroom.

 

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Rick Campanelli
Director of Graduate Ministries, Center for Christian Study
University of Virginia

Rick is the Center for Christian Study Director of Graduate Ministries for Law and Business students at the University of Virginia (UVa), and teaches Integrating Ethics in Public Policy at UVa’s Batten School of Leadership & Public Policy.   He received his J.D. and B.A. with honors in economics from UVA. Prior to moving to Charlottesville in 2016 to teach and serve with the Study Center, Rick worked in an array of senior law and public policy positions in government, private law practice, and private industry.  At the federal level he held positions ranging from Counselor to the Secretary for Science & Public Health and Director of the Office for Civil Rights at the US Department of Health & Human Services, to Senior Special Assistant to the Attorney General and Trial Attorney at the US Department of Justice.  In these roles he had significant responsibility for federal programs and policy on issues spanning privacy, protection against discrimination on the basis of disability and genetics, science and technology innovation, embryonic stem cell research, and protection of human rights and religious freedom.  In private law practice, Rick worked with Gammon & Grange, PC in McLean, Virginia, serving the broad array of legal needs of national and international nonprofits and ministries, and engaging in appellate advocacy on religious freedom and human life issues on behalf of those organizations.

 

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Kim Colby
Director, Center for Law & Religious Freedom
Christian Legal Society

Kim Colby has worked for Christian Legal Society’s Center for Law and Religious Freedom since graduating from Harvard Law School in 1981. She has represented religious groups in several appellate cases, including two cases heard by the United States Supreme Court. She has filed numerous amicus briefs in federal and state courts. In 1984, she assisted in congressional passage of the Equal Access Act, 20 U.S.C. § 4071, et seq., which protects the right of secondary school students to meet for prayer and Bible study on campus. Ms. Colby has prepared several CLS publications addressing issues about religious expression in public schools, including released time programs, implementation of the Equal Access Act, and teachers’ religious expression.

Ms. Colby graduated summa cum laude from the University of Illinois with a major in American History and a particular interest in slavery in colonial North America.

 

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Teresa Stanton Collett
Professor, University of St. Thomas School of Law

Teresa Collett is professor at the University of St. Thomas School of Law, where she serves as director of the school's Prolife Center. Collett received her doctorate at the University of Oklahoma College of Law. As a well-known advocate for the protection of human life and the family, Collett specializes in the subjects of marriage, religion and bioethics in her research. Collett has published numerous legal articles and is the co-author of a casebook on professional responsibility and co-editor of a collection of essays exploring “catholic” and “Catholic” perspectives on American law. She is an elected member of the American Law Institute, and has testified before committees of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives, as well as before legislative committees in several states.

In 2009, Pope Benedict XVI appointed Collett to a five-year term on the Pontifical Council for the Family. Her appointment was renewed by His Holiness Pope Francis until 2016 when the responsibilities of the Council were assumed by the Dicastery for the Laity, Family and Life. In 2013, she served as a delegate to the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) for the Mission of the Holy See to the United Nations. She represented Congressman Ron Paul and various medical groups in the defense of the U.S. federal ban of partial-birth abortion, and the governors of Minnesota and North Dakota defending the N.H. requirement of state parental involvement prior to performance of an abortion on a minor before the U.S. Supreme Court. Collett is often asked to represent the interests of government officials before federal appellate courts. She has served as special attorney general for the states of Oklahoma and Kansas, as well as assisting other state attorneys general in defending laws protecting human life and marriage. Prior to joining St. Thomas in 2003, Collett taught at the South Texas College of Law, where she established the nation's first annual symposium on legal ethics.

 

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Paige Cunningham
Executive Director, The Center for Bioethics & Human Dignity
Trinity International University

Paige Comstock Cunningham, JD, PhD is the executive director of The Center for Bioethics & Human Dignity. She is a Trustee of Taylor University. Cunningham is an affiliate professor of law and bioethics at Trinity Law School and Trinity Graduate School. She was an adjunct instructor at Wheaton College for eight years, and is a past president and board chair of Americans United for Life.

She graduated from Taylor University (summa cum laude), and earned her JD from Northwestern University Law School, MA Bioethics (summa cum laude) from Trinity International University, and PhD (Educational Studies) from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School.

 

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Natt Gantt, II
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Professor, &
Co-Director, Center for Ethical Formation & Legal Education Reform
Regent University School of Law

L.O. Natt Gantt, II, is professor and associate dean for academic affairs at Regent University School of Law. He also serves as co-director of Regent's Center for Ethical Formation and Legal Education Reform. Professor Gantt received his A.B. in psychology and political science, summa cum laude, from Duke University; his Juris Doctor, cum laude, from Harvard Law School; and his Master of Divinity, summa cum laude, from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary. Before joining Regent in 2000, he served as a law clerk to the late Honorable Donald S. Russell of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit; as an associate at Wiley, Rein & Fielding in Washington, D.C.; and as a proxy analyst at Fidelity Investments in Boston, Massachusetts. Professor Gantt has taught Professional Responsibility, Civil Procedure, Sales, and Contracts.

Professor Gantt's scholarship has focused on two primary areas: (1) law school academic support and legal education reform and (2) legal ethics and professional identity formation. He has been active on committees and in meetings related to the Law School Admission Council (LSAC), the Academic Support Section of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS), the Association of Academic Support Educators (AASE), and Educating Tomorrow's Lawyers (ETL). He has authored or co-authored a book chapter and numerous articles related to legal ethics and legal education and has spoken in various venues related to those topics, ranging from speaking at the 2015 African Christian Legal Education Summit to serving from 2010 to 2013 as a faculty member for the Virginia State Bar Harry L. Carrico Professionalism Course.

 

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David Nammo
Executive Director & CEO
Christian Legal Society

David Nammo has served as executive director and CEO of Christian Legal Society since 2012.

He is the former executive vice president of the Leadership Project for America, and has served as executive director of the Family Research Council Action (FRCA), the 501(c)(4) arm of the Family Research Council, where he worked on political issues, interfaced with Congress, and met with candidates from across the country. David consulted and worked for a variety of employers over several years, including Gammon & Grange, a Virginia law firm, defense consultants for the Defense Intelligence Agency, and as a sole practitioner practicing trademark and business contract law. He has served as director of attorney and law student ministries of Christian Legal.

Prior to attending law school at George Mason University School of Law and Chicago-Kent College of Law, David worked as a journalist for the Fox News Service, a Middle East wire service, and WTTG-TV in Washington D.C.

 

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Myron Steeves
Professor, Trinity Law School

Myron Steeves has served as a law professor at Trinity Law School since 1992. A graduate of Georgetown University Law Center, Professor Steeves has practiced law in the nonprofit area, particularly advising churches. Professor Steeves frequently speaks on issues including the integration of faith and law, legal careers as tools for Christian ministry, law and public policy, and law and theology.

 

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Craig Stern
Professor, Regent University School of Law

Professor Craig A. Stern is a professor at Regent University School of Law and the director of the Honors Program. He began as an adjunct with Regent in 1988 and came on full time in 1990. Stern received his J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law and his B.A. cum laude from Yale University. At Yale he studied Classics.

Stern has been admitted to the bar in Virginia, the District of Columbia, and several federal jurisdictions. He has served as an associate attorney for Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Kampelman, as the Assistant Deputy Director of the Legal and Administrative Agencies Group, Office of President-elect Ronald Reagan, as counsel to the Subcommittee on Separation of Powers, U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary, as the associate editor of BENCHMARK for the Center for Judicial Studies in Washington, D.C., and  Cumberland, Virginia, as special counsel and director of publications for the Constitutional Law Center, and as Special Assistant United States Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia in Norfolk. His teaching and research interests include: Human Rights, Federal Courts, Conflict of Laws, Jurisprudence, Legal History and Criminal Law.

 

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Jeff Ventrella
Senior Vice-President, Strategic Training
Alliance Defending Freedom

Jeffery J. Ventrella serves as Senior Counsel and Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs & Training for Alliance Defending Freedom. Since joining ADF in 2000, he has headed the ADF Blackstone Legal Fellowship, a unique legal internship program for outstanding law students. He also leads the design of ADF Areté Academy, providing training for exceptional college upperclassmen and recent graduates on a path to future leadership positions in a variety of disciplines.

Ventrella has served as a Research Fellow and a member of an ad hoc graduate thesis committee for the Department of Philosophy and Constitutional Law at the University of the Free State, South Africa. He is also a distinguished Fellow of law and culture for the Center for Cultural Leadership and a Fellow with the Ezra Institute for Contemporary Christianity. In 2014, TruthXchange appointed him Senior Fellow. As an approved speaker for The Federalist Society, he serves as an appointed member of the society’s executive committee—guiding its Religious Liberties Practice Group.

His book The Cathedral Builder: Pursuing Cultural Beauty (2007) is part of the Blackstone Legal Fellowship’s Core Curriculum Project, which he also edits. He is the author of numerous monographs and has contributed to or edited nine books.

Ventrella received a B.M.E. degree, magna cum laude, from the University of Northern Colorado, where he specialized in trumpet performance. He received a Ph.D. in church and state studies from Whitefield Theological Seminary and earned his Juris Doctor from the University of California Hastings College of the Law. He has practiced law since 1985 and is a member of the state bar of Idaho. He is also admitted to practice before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit, the U.S. District Court for the District of Idaho, and the U.S. Supreme Court.